Tooling the Workshop for Clockmakers and Modelmakers

$60.00

This 2-hour video is extremely detailed and offers many things: See how a bench lathe can be configured to do horizontal milling work by the use of an inexpensive mill drill spindle. See how a simple riser block can allow vertical milling on the same lathe. Learn to use the dividing plate and mill/drill spindle for cutting gears and pinions. Watch the free hand grinding of sheet metal drills, which cut a truly circular hole in extremely thin metal. Examine a simple motor mount for driving mill/drill spindles on three axes. Learn how simple it is to make an index plate from scratch and without the need for another dividing plate or index head. Watch how slide locks can be added to a Sherline lathe. See the hand turning of hardened and tempered steel in a Sherline lathe using the W. R. Smith T-rest, now being offered by Sherline. See how to make a saw table for the T-rest.  Learn how to make a filing rest and index a Sherline lathe for filing triangles, squares, hexes, etc. Learn the free-hand grinding of fly cutters and the hardening of them by the disappearing shadow method. Then watch the tempering of these cutters by the heat/color method. See how easily carbon steel parts can be blued with heat for a nice finish.

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This 2-hour video is extremely detailed and offers many things: See how a bench lathe can be configured to do horizontal milling work by the use of an inexpensive mill drill spindle. See how a simple riser block can allow vertical milling on the same lathe. Learn to use the dividing plate and mill/drill spindle for cutting gears and pinions. Watch the free hand grinding of sheet metal drills, which cut a truly circular hole in extremely thin metal. Examine a simple motor mount for driving mill/drill spindles on three axes. Learn how simple it is to make an index plate from scratch and without the need for another dividing plate or index head. Watch how slide locks can be added to a Sherline lathe. See the hand turning of hardened and tempered steel in a Sherline lathe using the W. R. Smith T-rest, now being offered by Sherline. See how to make a saw table for the T-rest.  Learn how to make a filing rest and index a Sherline lathe for filing triangles, squares, hexes, etc. Learn the free-hand grinding of fly cutters and the hardening of them by the disappearing shadow method. Then watch the tempering of these cutters by the heat/color method. See how easily carbon steel parts can be blued with heat for a nice finish.

Comments by Jerry Kenney (www.clocktools.com) – Bill has reached back to remember what he went through developing the shop he has now, and has made a video directed to practical ways for mechanics to make clock and other parts before they have every tool or machine on their wish list. This video is invaluable to anyone just starting to equip a shop, to anyone with a space problem, or to anyone unable to justify the cost of an extensively equipped machine shop. Bills new video is an unlocked box of tricks and secrets collected over a lifetime of finding a way to get any job done. I received an advanced copy of the video and, on second viewing, I began to make a list of specific items which I though were separate techniques or subjects. These are in addition to basic turning, and can be performed with a conventional bench lathe such as a Myford or South Bend, or a micro-lathe such as the Sherline. I noted twenty ideas before I lost count (some got past me) as well as a few other little tricks and ideas supplementing the main theme of the video. I learned several things, especially practical shortcuts, and I am not going to give them away. Bill Smith has placed a lot of emphasis on the use of Sherline products. He is not connected with the company, and I asked him why he emphasized Sherline products. His answer is in line with the objective of the video: “They are available at an affordable price.” I have to say that I would much rather have my Waltham-Nashua # 3 toolmaker’s lathe (which are almost totally unavailable) or my 9″ South Bend (good used ones now sell for more than the original purchase price). I was not an advocate of early Sherline products, but the company is continually improving its line, so I have to back off in the face of reality. Furthermore, Bill has included some improvements to these lathes that can be made by their owners. Sherline has even adopted some of his suggestions. Getting to specifics, Bill has shown how to make gears and pinions on a lathe, how to do both horizontal and vertical milling on the same lathe, making and using dividing plates for wheel cutting, the former with just the use of a steel tape measure! There are numerous ideas for drilling, making, and special grinding of drills, drilling lantern pinions, steps for making fly-cutters for wheels and pinions, and much valuable information about forming, hardening, and tempering tool steel. Want to know how to use your lathe for a metal cutting table saw, or a filing device? It’s all here, including how to make the attachments. There is a section of this video on spinning metal. This is the technique used to make pendulum bobs, bezels, and a lot of decorative hardware on clocks. I said I would not reveal any of Bill’s secrets, but I learned about a lubricant that will certainly improve the finish of my spinnings; and that’s as much as I am willing to reveal. In fairness, I have to say that this is not a video directed to craftsmen with well-equipped machine shops. Having said that, I do know that even the most advanced workmen are likely to learn a thing or two or three from this video. It prompts thought and ideas extending beyond the scope of the video. The video is certainly directed to anyone trying to expand his proficiency without waiting to get a fully equipped machine shop. I wish I had experienced the benefits of information like this forty years ago. Bill Smith is very emphatic that he makes his tapes, and writes his books, in order to pass on a lifetime of experience in horology and engineering. I understand his motives because I share them. Here we are, two old men trying to make our experience eaningful. (Bill is 78, and will get mad at me for telling.) I won’t speak for myself, but Bill’s information is worth hearing, seeing and reading.

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